SkillsAct4Vet – Training

Module 1 - Before the mobility

Exercise 1

Team development through Skills Analysis

Source: This activity has been developed by Etctoolkit.org.uk

http://files.eun.org/I-LINC/entrelearn_entrepreneurial_learning_toolkit_for_teachers.pdf 

Note:

In 2017,  Adi (SkillsAct4VET partner) established a cooperation  with European Schoolnet to translate Entrelearn. The translation was published for the first time in 2017 in “I LINC “ website , I LINC is a Horizon 2020 project that ended in 2017. http://www.eun.org/projects/detail?articleId=676311Entrelearn contains more than 65 entrepreneurial learning activities. Entrelearn is strictly connected with EntreComp : The Entrepreneurship Competence Framework, created by the Euroean Commission. Adi presented the framework together with one of the author ( Margherita Bacigalupo) during ADi international conference. The third document connected with Entrelearn and Entre Comp is “ Entre Comp into action”. Silvia Faggioli has been working as an external evaluator for EntreComp into action before its release.

Materials needed

Paper or flip-charts, pencils, computers or mobile phones.

Estimated time needed

2 hours

Description and guidelines

Students need to understand their role inside the team to become active, independent, accountable for their actions, and to take on necessary tasks.

In this activity, students seek to recognise the skills inherent within a team or needed by a group to achieve a goal/complete a task. This activity shows that self-awareness and self-efficacy apply to teams as well as to individuals. While presenting a group challenge (which could be an assessment or in-class group activity) ask the students in the group to identify the roles needed to deliver this task. The task could be for example a research study or a group project. Firstly, ask the students to identity the number and type of roles required to deliver the proposal, project, or group challenge. Typically, they will focus on the project outcomes, but ensure that they also think of the skills needed within the project, such as: effective communication, leadership, good organisation, patience, ability to listen. Using the flip chart, they can start to shape these responsibilities into roles or jobs. Some of their skills may be directly linked to roles, others may be standalone elements that they wish to see in the team and these can be identified on Post-its. Provide images of people or a new piece of flip chart and ask them to present the roles required to deliver the job/ meet the challenge. This can be presented to the group, or a poster-showcase can be created with the brief/project and their proposed solutions (job roles and skills).

Examples

  1. Students are given a list of charity projects and need to perform the following tasks within a set time: Find information about each project, Choose 1 project, Explain why, Present the project to the class explaining the reasons behind your choice. Lastly, the different presentations are voted on by the other groups.
  2. Ask students to go on a fictional shopping with a 20€ budget to prepare a birthday party for invited friends. To know the price of certain articles, they can search the Internet or use the leaflets of some shops (you can prepare them beforehand). The students, in groups, first write what they want to buy for the party (food, drinks, decoration…). They make a list of all the products and add a price to each. Then they have to fit into the 20€ budget, so probably they need to prioritise and to make some compromises within the group. Let groups present their purchases and compare their outcomes. Ask them to give feedback to each other.
  3. Contact a company and ask them to present their business based on the canvas. When the students visit the company, they take notes in their canvas and compare and discuss the model canvas they wrote down. Link to business model canvas https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/10/Business_Model_Canvas.png

Firstly, ask the students to identity the number and type of roles required to deliver the proposal, project, or group challenge. Typically, they will focus on the project outcomes, but ensure that they also think of the skills needed within the project, such as: effective communication, leadership, good organisation, patience, ability to listen. Using the flip chart, they can start to shape these responsibilities into roles or jobs. Some of their skills may be directly linked to roles, others may be standalone elements that they wish to see in the team and these can be identified on Post-its. Provide images of people or a new piece of flip chart and ask them to present the roles required to deliver the job/ meet the challenge. This can be presented to the group, or a poster-showcase can be created with the brief/project and their proposed solutions (job roles and skills).

Assessment and discussion

In order to analyse the skills developed through this task it is important to review both the process and outcome with the group. Reflection questions can include:

  • Who demonstrated leadership?
  • Who analysed the task most effectively?
  • How did you overcome any barriers – or “dead-ends” in your work?
  • What resources did you rely on?
  • What networking skills supported this task?

Ask the group to reflect upon the skills analysis they have undertaken and their ability to meet the challenge/task. What do they need within their team to be the “dream team” and what qualities would be useful? What steps do they need to take (personally and professionally) in order to develop their skills as team players for this particular challenge?